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Impulse (physics) print that page

In classical mechanics , an impulse (abbreviated I or J ) is defined as the integral of a force with respect to time . When a force is applied to a rigid body it changes the momentum of that body. A small force applied for a long time can produce the same momentum change as a large force

wikipedia.org | 2011/8/19 2:08:40

Physics engine print that page

SPARTA_animation

These are four examples of a physics engine simulating an object falling onto a slope. The examples differ in accuracy of the simulation: No physics . Gravity , no collision detection. Gravity and collision detection , no rigid body dynamics. Gravity, collision detection and rotation

Force print that page

Aristoteles_Louvre2

In physics , a force is any influence that causes a object to undergo a change in speed, a change in direction, or a change in shape. Force can also be described by intuitive concepts such as a push or pull that can cause an object with mass to change its velocity (which includes to begin

Defining equation (physics) print that page

In physics , defining equations are equations that define new quantities in terms of base quantities [ 1 ] . This article uses the current SI system of units , not natural or characteristic units . Contents 1 Treatment of vectors 2 Classical mechanics 2.1 Mass and inertia

wikipedia.org | 2011/10/5 16:01:22

Elementary physics formulae print that page

A list of elementary physics formulae commonly appearing in high-school and college introductory physics courses. The list consists primarily of formulas concerning mechanics , showing relations between matter , energy , motion , and force in Euclidean space , under the action of Newtonian

wikipedia.org | 2011/5/20 9:56:24

Mechanical impulse print that page

In classical mechanics , an impulse is defined as the integral of a force with respect to time . When a force is applied to a rigid body it changes the momentum of that body. A small force applied for a long time can produce the same momentum change as a large force applied briefly, because

wikipedia.org | 2010/9/27 0:33:56

Four-vector print that page

velocity 2.2 Four-acceleration 2.3 Four-momentum 2.4 Four-force 3 Lorentz transformation 4 Physics of four-vectors 4.1 E = mc 2 4.2 E 2 = p 2 c 2 + m 2 c 4 5 Examples of four-vectors in electromagnetism 6 See also 7 References [ edit ] Mathematics of four-vectors

wikipedia.org | 2011/5/16 4:54:26

Work (physics) print that page

Baseball_pitching_motion_2004

When a force acts on a body, its work is related to the change of energy of that body. In case of rigid bodies, this relation is expressed by the work-energy theorem (see below). Consequently, definition of work is frequently stated as: Work is the amount of energy transferred to a body by

Anti-gravity print that page

Negative mass 1.4 Fifth force 1.5 General-relativistic "warp drives" 1.6 Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program 2 Empirical claims and commercial efforts 2.1 Gyroscopic devices 2.2 Thomas Townsend Brown's gravitator 2.3 Gravitoelectric coupling 2.4 Recent progress 2.5

wikipedia.org | 2011/9/13 13:46:56

Maxwell's equations print that page

Magnetosphere_rendition

Maxwell's equations have two major variants. The "microscopic" set of Maxwell's equations uses total charge and total current including the difficult-to-calculate atomic level charges and currents in materials. The "macroscopic" set of Maxwell's equations defines two new auxiliary fields that